The study of English is designed to help students prepare themselves for a variety of professions and careers where individual talents are valued. It enables students to improve their writing skills, their articulation and their abilities in analytical reading—all valuable accomplishments. The study of literature refines one’s sensibilities, expands one’s outlook, and stimulates one’s imagination. It is a humanizing activity which helps one discover one’s self and one’s place in the world. 

Required for graduation: Students must complete a minimum of 40 semester hours at the 300 level.

Timothy R. Libretti, Ph.D., Professor, Chair
Timothy P. Barnett, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Marcia Z. Buell, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Vicki Byard, Ph.D., Professor
Chielozona Eze, Ph.D., Professor
Emily Garcia, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Bradley Greenburg, Ph.D., Professor
Julie H. Kim, Ph.D., Professor
Kristen L. Over, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Ryan Poll, Ph.D., Advisor and Coordinator of Academic Initiatives
Timothy H. Scherman, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Christopher L. Schroeder, Ph.D., Professor

ENGL-101. Writing I. 3 Hours.

Specialized instruction and practice in beginning writing. Work in usage, grammar, style, paragraphs, and short essays.

ENGL-102. Writing II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of practice in composition with emphasis on a variety of forms of writing and long essays, culminating in the annotated research paper.

ENGL-109A. First Year Experience:Chicago's Literary Diversity: Reading The Neighborhoods. 3 Hours.

This course explores how literary Chicago enters into discourses on race and ethnicity in twentieth century literature. Beginning with Great Migration, students sample literary history produced by people who settled or passed through Chicago. Writers have used Chicago as a setting for major works and sociological studies have attempted to focus on Chicago's neighborhoods and how they were formed as a result of immigration from other countries and migration from the American South. The course examines several works from popular perspectives, fiction, autobiography, journalism, humor, folktales, cultural criticism and regional studies to reach a better understanding of the city.

ENGL-109B. First Year Experience: Reading And Writing The Literary And Political Landscapes Of Chicago. 3 Hours.

From the Haymarket "riot" of 1886 to the Pullman Strike of 1894 to the Black Sox scandal of 1919 to the trial of Abbie Hoffman and the Chicago Seven in the aftermath of the Democratic Convention of 1968, Chicago has, to say the least, a colorful and quite literally, explosive political history. As with any major urban center in the United States, Chicago bears the historical scars and contemporary fruits of vibrant and violent class conflict, labor insurgencies, racial strife, immigrant struggles, and activism for social justice. Part and parcel of this historical legacy is a rich spate of cultural production that attempts to comprehend this past in those historical moments and in our contemporary era.

ENGL-109C. First Year Experience:Drama And Diversity In Chicago. 3 Hours.

In this class, we will analyze and experience Chicago theater. By emphasizing theater that challenges social cultural norms, we will consider how drama works to create and define diverse urban communities and how it offers alternative visions to the status quo. This class will emphasize writing and reading about drama, interviewing theater personnel and taking notes on actual theater performances, and relating art to social and political diversity. We will attend 3-4 performances during the course of the semester.

ENGL-109D. First Year Experience:Windy City Words: Ethnolinguistic Chicago. 3 Hours.

This course integrates the five foundations of the First-Year Experience (Future Planning, Integral Preparation, Research, Self-Discovery, and Transitions) with concepts from the study of literacy and language. Using the city as a field site, students actively explore the linguistic and cultural diversity of Chicago through independent research, readings, online resources, speakers, and other experiences.

ENGL-109E. First Year Experience: Your Chicago: Write On!. 3 Hours.

This course interweaves foundations of the First-Year Experience (Future Planning, Integral Preparation, Research, Self-discovery, Transitions) with specific concepts of creative writing. Explore and experience Chicago’s vibrant cultural scene while cultivating literary culture in class. Students study their local literary heritage reading, analyzing, and discussing works of classic and contemporary Chicago authors and attending and annotating literary readings at local bookstores and cafes; experimenting with a range of writing exercises, prompts, and assignments, students will craft their own stories, recognize their unique writing process, and learn techniques to revise and polish their prose, culminating in a student reading.

ENGL-201. The World Of Poetry. 3 Hours.

A literature course which has three main objectives: 1) to familiarize students with the literary conventions of poetry; 2) to develop in students a critical stance towards literature; and 3) to develop in students an appreciation of both western and non-western cultures as experienced through literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-202. The World Of Drama. 3 Hours.

A literature course which has three main objectives: 1) to familiarize students with the literary conventions of drama; 2) to develop in students a critical stance towards literature; and 3) to develop in students an appreciation of both western and non-western cultures as experienced through literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-203. The World Of Fiction. 3 Hours.

A literature course which has three main objectives: 1) to familiarize students with the literary conventions of the short story and novel genres; 2) to develop in students a critical stance towards literature; and 3) to develop in students an appreciation of both western and non-western cultures as experienced through literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-205. Literatures And Literacies. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the study of texts, as well as relevant historical, theoretical, and methodological contexts. It will also, as a general education course, assist students in developing the ability to communicate both in writing and speaking, the skills required to gather, analyze, document, and integrate information, an understanding of historical processes and cultural differences, aesthetic and literary sensitivity, and an understanding of the modes of thought, concerns and methodologies of the humanities and social/behavioral sciences.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-210. Writing Intensive Program: Methods for English Majors. 3 Hours.

Writing Intensive course designed as first course for English majors. Provides practical foundation in the methods essential to English Studies: active reading, critical thinking, and purposeful writing. Skills such as note taking, quoting, using MLA style, summarizing arguments, and synthesizing and documenting others' opinions will be emphasized. Course will also explore multiple perspectives on controversial topics relevant to the discipline. Coursework develops strategies of effective critique, argument, and analysis, and will consist of informal writing, review essays, and thesis-driven analyses of rhetorical and literary texts. Open discussion and critical thinking required.
Prerequisites: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C and ENGL-102 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-218. American Literature:Beginnings To 1865. 3 Hours.

A course covering representative writing of the Colonial, Early National and Romantic periods in American literature, emphasizing both dominant and emergent themes and literary forms in each period where students will build the necessart cultural literacy for higher-level courses in American Literature.

ENGL-219. American Literature:1865 To The Present. 3 Hours.

A course covering representative writings of the Realist, Modern and Postmodern periods in American Literature, emphasizing both dominant and emergent themes and literary forms in each period. Here students will gain a broad background for higher-level courses in postbellum American Literature.

ENGL-221. English Literature:The Beginnings To C. 1750. 3 Hours.

Representative works in English literature from Beowulf to the middle of the eighteenth century.

ENGL-222. English Literature: C. 1750 To The Present. 3 Hours.

Representative works in English literature from the middle of the eighteenth century to the modern era.

ENGL-235. Introduction To Creative Writing I. 3 Hours.

Preliminary study to enable students to develop positive approaches to the craft of writing and to explore techniques of the craft.

ENGL-240A. Elements Of Style For Creative Writers. 3 Hours.

The course provides a workshop setting in which students receive instruction in basic elements of grammar and style with particular relevance to their practice in creative writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-300. Russian Literature: From Gogol To Chekhov. 3 Hours.

Works (primarily novels, novellas and stories) of the major figures in nineteenth-century Russian literature (Turgenev, Tolstoi, Dostoyevski, etc.), relating them to the social, political and religious issues they touched on.

ENGL-301. Independent Study In English. 1 Hour.

An independent study on the tutorial model, initiated at the student's suggestion to an instructor; course content designed in consultation with the instructor.

ENGL-302. Love In Western Literature. 3 Hours.

The various attitudes toward love, including sexual and family relationships, as depicted in the literature of different ages and cultures with emphasis on the changing social, ethical and religious context of these views.

ENGL-303. Contemporary Gay And Lesbian Literature: Exploring Layers Of Difference. 3 Hours.

This course explores the impact of gay, lesbian, bisexual and tran-gendered literature on contemporary culture. We will take a multicultural approach that recognizes the importance of sexual identity to late twentieth-century fiction and the ways such fiction affects and is affected by art, politics, entertainment, the law, and other notions of identity, such as race, class, and gender. This course will emphasize close reading of fiction, the ability to write clearly and analytically about literature, and a careful analysis of the role literature plays in our everyday lives.

ENGL-307. Medieval Studies- The Development Of The Arthurian Legend. 3 Hours.

The legen of King Arthur from allusions in early chronicles, through Welsh folk tales, through the courtly versions of twelfth-century France to the compilation by Sir Thomas Malory.

ENGL-308. English Literature From Beowulf To Malory. 3 Hours.

A survey fo English Medieval literature that, in dealing with majore works (e.g. Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Morte D'Arthur, etc.), situates them in the revelant political and linguistic contexts, as well as the literary context of competing "minor" works and genres.

ENGL-309. Reading & Writing In A Changing Digital Economy. 3 Hours.

Through hands on experience and theoretical and rhetorical analyses, students will explore processes and issues with writing and reading in digital environments. Topics include connecting visuality with the written word, exploring online textual identities, collaboration and intellectual property, and web design, with an emphasis on how writing in digital environments impacts English studies. Students will produce a variety of non-traditional and traditional academic texts in this course, using current presentation, web-based or freeware programs. The class is open to students who are new to digital writing but will also benefit those with experience in composing New Media and digital texts.

ENGL-310. Writing Intensive Program:Introduction To Composition Studies. 3 Hours.

Examines some contemporary issues in composition studies, such as process theory, the role of grammar in writing instruction, digital and visual literacies, and scholarly considerations of writers' subjectivities. Introduces the discipline's modes of inquiry: theory, empirical research, and practice. Provides instruction in professional resources and bibliographic databases so that students can become independent learners in the discipline. Written assignments include responses to readings and a literature review. This course fulfills the NEIU Writing Intensive requirement for Secondary Education English majors and for English majors who as transfer students may have already taken a course comparable to ENGL-210.

ENGL-311. Introduction To Cultural Studies. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the theoretical debates and interpretative strategies of cultural studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how culture is produced, distributed, consumed, and responded to in diverse, contradictory ways. Cultural forms analyzed will include movies, comics, television, photography, music, fan fiction, and video games.

ENGL-312. Literature Of Colonial Times. 3 Hours.

Prose and poetry of the Puritan and Revolutionary eras.

ENGL-313. American Literary Renaissance-1830-1860. 3 Hours.

Prose and poetry of Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, and others.

ENGL-314. Chaucer And His Age. 3 Hours.

Close study of selected early poems of Chaucer (ballads, envoys, and narratives), to present and introduction to the language and themes of Chaucer's poetry and his age. The major portion of the course will be devoted to a close reading of The Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English.

ENGL-315. Literature Of The English Renaissance. 3 Hours.

Prose and poetry (not drama) of the English Renaissance in the sixteenth century.

ENGL-316. Forms Of Poetry. 3 Hours.

This course will examine some of the traditional poetic forms-lyric, narrative, and dramatic- which have been used by poets throughout literary history. Readings and discussion will engage students in an analysis of each form- its technical characteristics, its place in literary history, and its relevance to comtemporary writers and readers of poetry. Students will write imitations of several poetic forms as well as critical essays about them.

ENGL-317. Modern American Drama. 3 Hours.

Major lines fo development of modern American Drama form O-Neill to contemporaries like Albee and Mamet.

ENGL-319. Writing Culture And Identity. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will explore theoretical, political, and cultural understandings of difference and identity through intensive reading and writing. Students will develop a deep understanding of cultural difference and the ability to write argumentative, personal, and theoretical essays about human diversity in a variety of forms.
Prerequisites: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C and ENGL-102 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-320. Globalizing Literacies. 3 Hours.

This course presents textual circulation as trade in cultural practices throughout early modern or protoglobalization (1600-1800) when European traditions were exported to the United States that, after being established through cultural syncretism, were exported to the rest of the world throughout the first (18701914) and second (1980present) globalization periods. From these perspectives, students will examine central themes in textual production and consumption, such as the development of an American literary tradition and Americanization educational initiatives through particular genres, such as newspapers and magazines, as a part of a nationalized cultural identity, including ways this identity has been resisted and reconfigured.

ENGL-321. Literature Of The Romantic Movement. 3 Hours.

Poetry and prose from 1780 to 1830 including Blake, Burns, Wordsworth, Colerisge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, Hazlitt, and DeQuincey.

ENGL-322. The American Short Story. 3 Hours.

The evolution of the American short story as a self-conscious form of literature from Washington irving to Joyce Carol Oates. The theories of Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism are illustrated. Each student selects one writer of short stories to explore in some depth through an individual report.

ENGL-323. Shaw And Modern British Drama. 3 Hours.

Shaw's development as a playwright as well as significant movements in British drama since the 1890's, including the Irish Renaissance, recent poetic drama and the "angry young men.".

ENGL-324. The Romantic Novel. 3 Hours.

The nineteenth century novelists from England and the Continet are studied against the great socio-political movements of the age- the French, Russian and Industrial Revolutions.

ENGL-327. Chicago Drama. 3 Hours.

This course examines the history of Chicago drama from the early performances of Joseph Jefferson to modern and contemporary playwrights, such as Tennessee Williams and David Mamet, who have found success in or been shaped by Chicago, as well as its contributions to dram in the United States and around the world.

ENGL-328. Seventeenth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

Studies in seventeenth century literature exclusive of Milton.

ENGL-329. Milton. 3 Hours.

Milton's work and the intellectual millieu of the period.

ENGL-330. Shakespeare: Comedies And Romances. 3 Hours.

Shakespeare's comic writing, from The Comdey of Errors, through the romantic comedies and problem comedies to the late romances.

ENGL-331. Shakespeare: Tragedies. 3 Hours.

Shakespeare's tragic works from early experiments in tragedy, e.g., Romeo and Juliet, Richard III, to the great achievements in tragedy, e.g. Hamlet, Lear, Macbeth.

ENGL-332. Elizabethan And Jacobean Drama. 3 Hours.

Major dramatists, excluding Shakespeare, in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, 1550 to 1642, including Kyd Marlowe, Webster, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher from the origin of professional and court drama to the closing of the theatres.

ENGL-333. Mythological Backgrounds Of English And American Literature. 3 Hours.

Middle-Eastern, Nordic and Graeco-Roman mythological systems; reading in archetypal interpretation of literature with representative illustrations form fiction, drama and poetry.

ENGL-334. Biblical Backgrounds Of English And American Literature. 3 Hours.

Influence of the Bible, especially the King James version, on the style and content of famous English and American writers. Seleceted reading from Old and New Testaments and from writers influenced by them.

ENGL-335. Written Communications For Business. 3 Hours.

Designed primarily for Business and Management majors covering principles and practices of writing required in professional work.

ENGL-336. Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

This course asks students to study the ways writers prepare professional documents, including reports, proposals, and web sites, in a world where our languages are becoming increasingly technical, jargon-filled, and diverse. Students will write in these modes as well to give them experience with the kinds of technical writing they may encounter in fields such as business, science, engineering, and more.
Prerequisites: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C and ENGL-102 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-340. Independent Study In English. 2 Hours.

An independent study on the tutorial model, initiated at the student's suggestion to an instructor; course content designed in consultation with the instructor.

ENGL-341. Restoration And Eighteenth Century Literature I. 3 Hours.

Politics in England leading to the restoration of Charles II; his court; Restoration playwrights; the bawdy Restoration stage and reaction to it; the new sentimental drama; the newspaper and the essay.

ENGL-342. Restoration And Eighteenth Century Literature II. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of contrasts in the Age of Enlightenment; interrelationship of politics and writers; neoclassic literature; beginning of the novel; eighteenth century critiscm and biography.

ENGL-343. Global Ecologies: U.S. Literature In The Age Of Environmentalism. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course explores why studying the environment is one of the most urgent, intellectual responsibilities of all disciplines, including English. Global Ecologies centers on how the environment is represented, imagined, and refigured across a range of literary and cultural texts, and the course studies how the environment is inextricable from understanding a range of social relations from race and class to ethics and politics.

ENGL-345. Practical Criticism. 3 Hours.

Introduction to some of the more important critical approaches to literature, emphasis on application as well as theory.

ENGL-348. Prose And Poetry Of The Victorian Age. 3 Hours.

Selected Victorian poetry, with consideration of the social background of the period (1837-1910).

ENGL-350. The Victorian Novel. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of the novel in England from Dickens to Hardy, seen against the contemporary social and literary background. Theme and technique of the novel, methods of publication, major and minor writers.

ENGL-351. The English Novel Of The Eighteenth Century. 3 Hours.

The development of the English novel as a genre in the eighteenth century, including such precursors of the novel as Bunyan, Defoe, Lyly and Behn.

ENGL-352. Jewish-American Literature: People Of The Books. 3 Hours.

This course studies how the United States shapes the meaning of Jewish identity and culture, and conversely, how Jewish literature helps shape the meaning of American identity and culture. Working in a range of forms from comic books to genre fiction, Jewish writers throughout the modern era creatively and critically interrogate and re-imagine what it means to be Jewish-American, and more broadly, investigate and challenge what it means to be American.

ENGL-355. The Production Of "America": Work, Class, & Political Economy In U.S. Literature & Culture. 3 Hours.

This class will explore U.S. literature and culture with an eye toward understanding the material conditions of production in the United States, particularly as represented in literary and cultural works, as well as how national identity is ideologically produced in U.S. culture. The class will foreground issues of class and political economy in reading literature and culture from a working-class perspective.
Requirement: English 101 with a C or better, and two of the following: ENGL-210, ENGL-218, ENGL-219, ENGL-221, or ENGL-222.

ENGL-356A. Graphic Novels And Comics. 3 Hours.

This course studies comics as a complex medium that offers new ways to think about and represent a range of social and cultural issues, such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, national belonging, and the environment. Students will learn the critical vocabulary necessary to understand how the medium works, and read diverse comics in various historical and geographical contexts.

ENGL-357. Land, Labor, & Literature: Studying The Works Of U.S. Working-Class & Colonized Writers. 3 Hours.

We will study the representations of land and labor and the desire to reclaim them in the works of working-class and colonized writers in the U.S. Particular attention will be paid to the historical and cultural contexts in which texts are produced as well as theories of class and race.

ENGL-358. Making Your Liberal Arts Degree Work: Writing For The Professional World & Internships. 3 Hours.

This course provides a personal and professional communications orientation, covering the integrated
landscape of digital media. Students will learn to adapt their writing for such practices as social marketing, blogging, headline writing, messaging, networking, community building and resume development. Whether a students’ ultimate career goals lead them to freelance, startup, non-profit or corporate endeavors, this course helps students learn more about putting their degree to work.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-359. Independent Study In English. 3 Hours.

An independent study on the tutorial model, initiated at the student's suggestion to an instructor; course content designed in consultation with the instructor.

ENGL-360. Detective Fiction. 3 Hours.

Literary and historical study of the detective story- from Poe and Sherlock Holmes- to Hammett and the present.

ENGL-361. Development Of The American Novel. 3 Hours.

The novel as a developing form from Charles Brockden Brown to William Faulkner and beyond.

ENGL-362. United States Fiction: Traditions And Counter-Traditions. 3 Hours.

A study of canonical and non-canonical fiction in the United States and the varieties of traditions composing U.S. literary history.

ENGL-364. Reading Film. 3 Hours.

A course in film emphasizing methods of reading films as we would texts. Through close viewing, critical analysis of narrative structure, attention to visual form and representational practice, students will explore the complexity of film beyond the level of "entertainment." To paraphrase a famous question asked about poetry, this course will explore "how a film means.".

ENGL-365. Caribbean Literature. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to literature (poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama) of the Caribbean in its his historical, political, social, and cultural contexts. Students will discuss such issues as cultural and racial hybridity, immigration/emigration/exile, and post-colonization, among others. Students will read representative texts from a diverse range of authors such as Jean Rhys, V.S. Naipaul, Earl Lovelace, Edwidge Danticat, and Junot Díaz.

ENGL-367. Re-Thinking Race And Gender. 3 Hours.

This intensive summer course runs for ten days over three weeks. It takes up history critically to engage in a concentrated re-thinking of how we learn to see, identify, and inhabit issues of race and gender. Workshops, lectures, and sessions with invited guests will unpack structures and relations of race and gender and the ways they get naturalized. The course is designed for graduates, undergraduates, and teachers, and is cross-listed in the Graduate College and the College of Arts and Sciences. Prereqs: Graduate status or Junior/Senior status in English, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, WGS, AFAM, or LGBTQ.

ENGL-368. American Realism. 3 Hours.

An examination of the literature that reflects the movement from American romanticism to realism and through realism to literary naturalism, approximately 1865-1910.

ENGL-369. U.S. Latino/a Literature And Culture. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to Latino/a literatures in the US from the contact period to the present. It offers an overview of major forms and themes in literature from Latino/a native, immigrant and exiled writers with in-depth analysis of representative texts from various genres including essays, novels, poetry and drama. Writers will include Latino/as of North American, Central American, South American and Caribbean descent. The course is taught in English with readings in original English or translation. Readings, assignments, instruction and discussion will focus on questions of aesthetics, culture, politics and history, with an added emphasis on inclusion of under-represented groups and intercultural connections.

ENGL-370. Folklore And The Fairy Tale. 3 Hours.

Readings from both traditional and contemporary folktales, including modern adaptations of traditional stories. Emphasis on similirarities in different tales, and the differences in similar ones, with the aim of learning how the same elements pervade the archetypical stories and how variations in detail bespeak different ethnic and cultural interests and concerns.

ENGL-371. Studies In Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

Literature by or about women; includes writing by women, portrayals of female characters, attitudes toward women and women's roles; other thematic concerns.

ENGL-372. American Women Writers Of The Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours.

Comprehensive study of texts and contexts of women's writing in the US during the nineteenth century, including the origins of its feminist tradition. Texts include a variety of genres (novel, short story, lecture, travel narrative) and traditions (sentimental, romantic, realist, political, utopian). Special emphasis on the social, political, economic and legal forces bearing upon women as professional writers along with the ways women's fiction articulates the realities of nineteenth-century women's lives. Assignments include close reading of individual texts and a more comprehensive final project involving primary research.

ENGL-373. Yiddish Literature In Translation. 3 Hours.

Yiddish literature from its beginning to the present from Eastern European and West Germany to the East Side and West Roosevelt Road.

ENGL-374A. Hybrid-form Writing. 3 Hours.

This course examines models related to and provides tools for the production of Hybrid-form Writing (writing in and across multiple genres/forms). Hybrid-form work takes place at both the discrete level (individual, usually long-form pieces) and the manuscript level (a book-length project that relies on multiple forms). The emphasis is on long-form/extended projects, which must be rooted in a considered line of inquiry. This inquiry happens at multiple stages and levels: students experiment with different forms, students engage in pre-writing to conceive of projects, and students consider how form affects content/why certain forms might be culturally or personally privileged.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-375. Essentials Of Tutoring Writing. 3 Hours.

This class considers the larger theoretical debates important to composition studies todau and the practical aspects of writing tutorials. Students will read contemporary writing theory and apply this knowledge in work with small groups of undergraduate writers, helping them to create ideas, draft and revise essays, and edit their work. To succeed in this class, students need to be strong writers and collaboratos and to have an interest in the practice and politics of writing.

ENGL-376. Advanced Composition. 3 Hours.

Interdependence of rhetoric, grammar, logic, semantics, psychology, and criticism in communication of ideas; practice in various types of writing with focus on students' interest.

ENGL-377. Argumentative Prose. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in which students will learn to write argumentative essays on a wide range of subjects, using as models for dicussion the argumentative prose of professional writers. The course will cover many aspects of argumentative writing, including the study of inductive and deductive reasoning and logical fallacies and the analysis of organizational and stylistic techniques.

ENGL-378. Twentieth Century Fiction I. 3 Hours.

Development of the modern novel from Conrad to writers of the 1930s and 1940s agaisnt a background of historical and literacy movements; emphasis on Conrad, James, Joyce, Lawrence, Faulkner and Hemingway.

ENGL-379. Twentieth Century Fiction II. 3 Hours.

Development fo the novel in English in recent decades against a background of historical and literary movements; includes work or West, Green, Lowry, Durrell, Bellow, Nabokov, Burgess, Barth, Lessing, Murdoch, Mailer, Updike and Pynchon.

ENGL-380. Multi-Cultural Literature In America. 3 Hours.

Designed for future teachers of English, the multi-genre course provides students with an awareness of representative literature from the various ethnic cultures that are a part of American Life.

ENGL-381. African-American Literature. 3 Hours.

A survey of African-American Literature in its social, cultural, and political context, beginning with Phyllis Wheatly, continuing through the slave narratives of the pre-Civil War era to the masterpieces of the Harlem Renaissance and the works of contemporary writers, such as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Alice Walker, August Wilson and Gwendolyn Brooks.

ENGL-382. Chicano/A Literature. 3 Hours.

In the mid-1960s a literature developed written by authors of Mexican heritage residing permanently in the United States and further identifiable as "Chicano" in that is coincided with the civil rights struggle by and for that group in the same period-the Chicano Movement. Certainly people of Mexican extraction living in the United States produced literary works prior to the 1960s. Chicano Literature, however, as most people use the term, is that which is associated with a new consciousness of political, social and cultural identity linked to the Chicano Movement. This course will study the emergence and development of this literature in relation to the historical conditions that gave rise to it and in relation to the development of Chicago/a cultural national identity underwriting the literature. Moreover, as the literature has continued to develop since the 1960s, we will explore the evolution of the literature with a particular focus on how the literature has taken part in a larger cultural contestation over and redifinition of the content of Chicano/a identity and politics, particularly from feminist and gay and lesbian perspectives. Students must have as a prerequisite for this course at least ENGL-101.

ENGL-383. Postcolonial African Literature. 3 Hours.

A survey of African literature in its cultural, historical, social and political contexts. Africa is a continent of diverse peoples, cultures, languages, customs, food, economies, experiences of colonialism/imperialism and so on. With such diversity of daily life and historical and cultural experiences comes a wealth of literature; oral literature, drama, poetry, short stories and novels. This course will cover diverse authors such as Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Zakes Mda, Nurrudin Farah, Buchi Emecheta, Tsitsi Dangarembga, etc.

ENGL-384. Creative Writing: Poetry I. 3 Hours.

Students write poetry which is discussed and critiqued in class by instructor and students.
Prerequisites: ENGL-102 minimum grade of C and ENGL-235 minimum grade of C or ENGL-236 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-385. Creative Writing: Poetry II. 3 Hours.

Students write poetry which is discussed and critiqued in class by instructor and students.

ENGL-386. Creative Writing: Fiction I. 3 Hours.

Students write prose poetry which is discussed and critiqued in class by instructor and students.

ENGL-387. Creative Writing: Fiction II. 3 Hours.

Students write prose poetry which is discussed and critiqued in class by instructor and students.

ENGL-388. Modern British And American Poetry. 3 Hours.

Introduction to modern poetry in English: its origins, dominant themes, and characteristic techniques.

ENGL-389. Contemporary Poetry. 3 Hours.

A survey of poetry in English from 1950 to the present. This course will examine the major themes and techniques of poets writing during the period.

ENGL-390. Young Adult Novel. 3 Hours.

Advanced study in literature for yound adults, grades 7-10. Evaluation and selection of recent books in the area as well as the history of the genre. Criteria for selection: Book lists, indexes, professional literature in the field. Individual work on problem of special interest.

ENGL-391. Children's Literature. 3 Hours.

Preparation for effective teaching of literature in the elementary school; wide reading of books for young children; story selection and story telling; authors and illustrators of children's books; classrom methods of stimulating creative expression; individual and group reading guidance.

ENGL-393. Literature Live: Studying The Works Of NEIU Visiting Writers. 3 Hours.

Each year the university runs a Visiting Writers Series. In this course, students will study the works of these writers, who will be coming to campus and with whom they will have a chance to engage, with an eye toward understanding and exploring the subtleties of craft to assist in their own creative writing as well as developing the skills of literary analysis. Students will be expected to attend a certain number of public readings in the series.
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-394. Writing The Personal Essay. 3 Hours.

In this course students will write in the creative non-fiction genre of the personal essay. This will involve work on techniques and approaches in a workshop setting, as well as critiques of other students' work. This course will also explore the personal essay as a literary form through readings of classic and recent examples.

ENGL-3941. Creative Writing Internship. 1 Hour.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-3942. Creative Writing Internship. 2 Hours.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-3943. Creative Writing Internship. 3 Hours.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-3944. Creative Writing Internship. 4 Hours.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-3945. Creative Writing Internship. 5 Hours.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-3946. Creative Writing Internship. 6 Hours.

This is a supervised field experience in a profession that utilizes creative writing (magazine or book publishing, journalism, advertising, arts non-profit, etc). With the approval of the department chair, students may enroll for academic credit from 1-6 hours. In consultation with a faculty advisor and field supervisor, the student will contract field service hours and create an individualized work plan. Students will also meet regularly with the faculty advisor and be evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for a final grade. By department permission only.
Prerequisites: ENGL-235 minimum grade of C and ((ENGL-384 minimum grade of C or ENGL-386 minimum grade of C) and ((ENGL-385 minimum grade of C or ENGL-387 minimum grade of C or ENGL-374 minimum grade of C).

ENGL-395. The Craft Of The Short Story. 3 Hours.

In this course students will combine the study of the form of the short story with writing short stories. Readings will include classical and contemporary works from across many countries and traditions. Emphasis will be on studying texts and working on craft in workshops.

ENGL-396. Screenwriting: The Short Script. 3 Hours.

This is a workshop course in screenwriting, concentrating on producing a short script. Students will study the particular form and conventions, as well as the specific format, of writing a screenplay. Readings will include exemplary screenplays in several genres, as well as essays on the philosophy and technique of screen writing. In workshop students will produce a short script.
Prerequisite: and ENGL-235 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-397. Summer Creative Writing Institute. 3 Hours.

Offered only in summer as an intensive course that runs for most of a day over two to three weeks. Specializing in either fiction or poetry, students participate in workshops as well as sessions with invited speakers with subjects such as: craft of poetry and short fiction, women's poetry, the profession of writing and publishing, how to get published, and the MFA. The emphasis is on an intense workshop experience and an atmosphere of constructive critique leading to the production of a significant portfolio of writing.

ENGL-409A. Writing In Public: Community Literacies, Public Intellectuals, And Rhetorics Of Change. 3 Hours.

This course looks at “public” writing and teaching in the work of marginalized communities, social movements, and public intellectuals. The primary goal is to understand writing as a contested, political act that can influence the public sphere but can also serve as a tool for oppression and control. This course is appropriate for students interested in theories and the teaching of writing and for students interested in critical and community education.
Requirement: At least six credits in the English MA program or by consent of instructor.

ENGL-410. Literary Methods And Practice. 3 Hours.

A foundation course that will build on existing skills and prepare for further graduate-level studies, with a goal of contextualizing and conceptualizing critical attitudes and approaches to literary text. Its aim is to provide advanced critical and scholarly tools for understanding literature and will address crtiticism and critical method, close reading and analysis and bibliographical and research technique. Required in the first year of study in the Literature Concentration.

ENGL-411A. Cultural And Literary Studies: History, Theory, Practice. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the institutional history, theoretical debates, and interpretative strategies of cultural studies, with a particularly interest in how the study of culture, understood broadly, intersects and changes literary studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores how cultural processes and forms are produced, distributed, consumed, and responded to in diverse, contradictory ways. Moreover, the course will emphasize how all culture must be studied on multiple scales, ranging from the local to the global.

ENGL-413A. Crafting The MA List: Composing Literary, Cultural, And Compositional Fields. 3 Hours.

This course examines some of the history and theories of English as a discipline to help students develop deep background knowledge of the field and conduct independent research that will help them construct their MA exam lists/fields of study. The collaborative work of the class helps students connect the various threads of English they are examining individually to the larger context of English Studies, and students are given extensive guidance as they work toward professional research agendas.

ENGL-414. Seminar In Reading Film. 3 Hours.

A seminar in film emphasizing methods of reading films as we would texts. Students will explore the complexity of film through close viewing, critical analysis of narrative structure, and attention to visual form and representational practice. To paraphrase a famous question asked about poetry, this course will explore "how a film means.".
Prerequisite: ENGL-101 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-415. Medieval Literature: Ricardian Poetry. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the prolific literary production associated with the reign in England of Richard II (1377-1399), including the works of Chaucer, Gower, Langland, the Gawain poet, Julian of Norwich, and others. Using various approaches, course will investigate the period's innovation, its relation to British literary tradition and to 14th - 15th-century historical change.

ENGL-418. Studies In Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of Shakespeare's work, organized by theme. This course will explore a number plays grouped together by an organizing principle (such as "Shakespeare and History," "Shakespeare and the Other," "The Roman Plays," "Romance"). These works will also be placed in their historical context, paying close attention to genre, structure, and language. Students will aslo study thoretical approaches to Shakespeare's work in reading of contemporary critical works.

ENGL-419. Elizabethan And Jacobean Drama. 3 Hours.

Exploration of English dramatic works from circa 1580-1642, including Marlowe, Greene, Middleton, Marston, Dekker, Jonson, Webster, and Beaumont. This course will pay particular attention to genres that dominate outside the Shakespeare canon (revenge tragedy, city comedy, tragicomedy), as well as detailing the social, cultural, and intellectual developments that characterize this golden age of English stagecraft.

ENGL-420. Teaching Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

This intensive summer course focuses on the teaching of Shakespeare's drama. In order to develop methods for teaching these plays at all levels we will study a few selected plays along with secondary literature. Moving from close textual analysis to a workshop will allow students to work on practical approaches to teaching the plays at the level of plot, characterization, theme, genre, performance, and more. Course material will be expanded with the help of documentaries, films, small group workshops, and guest faculty. Prerequisite: MA or at-large status. Or Permission of Instructor.

ENGL-421. The Metaphysical Poets. 3 Hours.

The metaphysical tradition in seventeenth century poetry and its impact on modern poetry, including works of Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan and Traherne and critical studies of Johnson, Grierson, Eliot, Leavis, Williamson and others.

ENGL-422. Milton. 3 Hours.

Study of a turbulent and exciting "century of revolutions" by concentrating on the figure most associated with seventeenth-century English literature, John Milton. We will read all of his major peotry as well as some significant prose writings. We will also attempt to contextualize Milton in his period by studying other major figures such as Ben Jonson, Andrew Marvell, and John Bunyan.

ENGL-426. Seminar In Romantic Literature. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of the major poets of the Romantic period, involving oral reports, and culminating in a term paper.

ENGL-427A. Pedagogies Of College Level Writing. 3 Hours.

In this course, students apply theoretical learning to practical considerations of teaching writing at the college level through textbook and assignment analysis, syllabus design, and lesson design for writing aspects, such as developing rhetorical strategies, attending to grammar and responding to student work. The course also addresses everyday aspects of teaching such as incorporating effective discussions, setting up culturally sensitive classes, and understanding the realities of employment at the college level. The course is open to students in MA composition or literature students, and students with graduate standing in related field.

ENGL-428. The English Novel. 3 Hours.

Study of the English novel from its origins in the 18th century "Rise of the Novel" tradition, through Gothic/Romantic and Victorian Fiction, to Modernism and Post-Modernism. Individual readings may vary, but students are likely to read works by Defoe, Bronte, Woolf, Lawrence, Conrad, etc.

ENGL-429. Writing Across The Curriculum. 3 Hours.

Through class discussion and activities, textual analyses and inquiry-based research assignments, this class explores connections between writing and the creation and representation of knowledge within academic disciplines. Topics include defining what counts as appropriate evidence in various fields, and the role of English departments in writing in the disciplines pedagogy. Though not intended to be guided instruction in the mechanics of writing, students will gain deeper insight into what counts as quality writing in their disciplines, so in addition to MA Composition graduate students, this course is open to graduate students in other fields with written permission by the instructor.

ENGL-430. Studies In Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

A study of some of the central problems and issues of contemporary criticism, as exemplified by the writings of major theorists.

ENGL-431. Bibliography And Research In English. 3 Hours.

Material, methods, and tools of literary research; use of libraries; preparation of scholarly papers.

ENGL-432. Alternative Literacies. 3 Hours.

This course will explore literacy theories within and beyond composition studies by considering competing models of literacy and the cultural dimensions of writings, such as economic class or multilingualism, as well as the implications of these for the practice of writing and writing instruction.

ENGL-433. Seminar In Composition Theory. 3 Hours.

This course includes an extensive examination of current composition methodologies with emphasis upon the eclectic needs of the composition student.

ENGL-434. Seminar In Basic Writing Theory. 3 Hours.

A survey of types of students in basic writing classes, a review of placement tests for identifying levels of writing compentency, and a careful examination of various basic writing methodologies.

ENGL-435. Writing Assessment: Theory And Practice. 3 Hours.

Theoretical background on evaluating student writing, as well as practical training in how to diagnose and remediate problems with grammar and content at the secondary and college level.

ENGL-436. Rhetorics Of Composition. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a background in Classical Rhetoric and then examine how the conventions of Classical Rhetoric have been translated or transformed into rhetorics of composition, such as Expressionistic Rhetoric, Cognitive Rhetoric, Epistemic Rhetoric and Social Construct Rhetoric.

ENGL-437. English Studies And Technology. 3 Hours.

Many scholars in English argue that the computer is radically revising the way we read and write texts. Using sources from literary and rhetorical studies, this class will consider how computer technology is contributing to new notions of the author, text, and audience as well as to the ways computers affect students' reading and writing.

ENGL-438. Research In Composition. 3 Hours.

Materials and methods for library research in composition theory; preparation of scholarly work on composition; research designs and measurement techniques for qualitative and quantitative studies in composition.

ENGL-439. Stylistics. 3 Hours.

Examination of the historical relationship of style to rhetoric; techniques for improving prose style; aspects of style as a part or writing evaluation.

ENGL-440. Malory. 3 Hours.

Examination of Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur concetrating on structure and interpretation, while considering current controversies over authorship and the state of the text; attention to the position of the work in the development of the Arthurian legend and in the context of the fifteenth century.

ENGL-456. William Blake. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of the works of Blake, noting the religious, political and social beliefs, opinions and doctrines his works evaluate and challange.

ENGL-457. The Poetry And Prose Of Shelley. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of the poetry and prose works of Shelley in the light of his social, religious, and political milieu and with the aid of pertinent scholarship regarding the poet.

ENGL-458. Troilus And Criseyde. 3 Hours.

Study of the development of the legend of Troilus from a brief mention in The Iliad through the dramatic treatment in 12th century chronicles and Boccaccio's great romance to Chaucer's major verse 'novel' and Shakespeare's enigmatic drama.

ENGL-459. Dante. 3 Hours.

Study of the poetry (in translation) of the major Italian poet of the Middle Ages and Renaissance concetrating on the Vita Nuova and the Diven Comedy with consideration of the theological, philosophical and cultural sources of Dante's work.

ENGL-461. Dostoyevski: The Major Works. 3 Hours.

Dostoevski's major works (such as Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Brothers Karamazov) in relation to the social, political and religious issues which concerned the writer.

ENGL-466. American Renaissance Revisited. 3 Hours.

A critical study of mid-19th century U.S. literature that explores the writers identified with the "American Renaissance" and their relationship to other important literary developments such as the slave narrative and women's domestic fiction.

ENGL-467. The Age Of Literary Realism In The United States. 3 Hours.

A study of U.S. literary realism, the cultural and socio-historical conditions of its emergence, and its relation to other later 19th century literary genres such as sentimentalism and naturalism. Authors might include Twain, Howells, James, Chesnutt, Wharton, Dreiser, Chopin, and others.

ENGL-468. U.S. Literary Modernism & Its Others. 3 Hours.

A study of literary developments in the United States from the early 20th century to the Cold War, focusing on the rise of modernism, proletarian literature, literature of the Harlem Renaissance, and other important bodies of literature.

ENGL-469. Seminar In Southern Literature. 3 Hours.

Intensive reading of twentieth-century Southern literature exclusive of Faulkner with emphasis on the sociological and psychological aspects of the literature as they mirror in America's South.

ENGL-470. Seminar In Faulkner. 3 Hours.

Intensive reading of the short fiction and novels of William Faulkner with specific attention on his development as a novelist and his place among twentieth century American authors.

ENGL-471. Studies In The American Novel. 3 Hours.

A study of major developments in the U.S. novel, this course might feature a variety of foci, including the rise of the novel in America, particularly literary periods or genres, key moments of transition in U.S. literary history, or other key evolutions in novelistic practice in the United States.

ENGL-474. Seminar In Byron. 3 Hours.

Close examination of the poetic canon of Lord Byron.

ENGL-475. Seminar In Keats. 3 Hours.

Close examination of the poetic canon of John Keats.

ENGL-476. Oil Fictions: Reading Along The Transnational Pipeline. 3 Hours.

This course brings together multiple literary genres and cultural forms to study diverse voices along the transnational oil pipelines, from privileged subjects whose desires, values, and lifestyles are enabled by mass oil consumption, to the communities and geographies that suffer the consequences of this oil dependency, social relations typically rendered invisible and inaudible by the dominant forms of globalization.

ENGL-477. Producing "America":Issues Of Work, Class, And Political Economy In U.S. Literature And Culture. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on literary and cultural works that represent the material conditions of production in the United States as well as on the way we ideologically produce American identity and culture in ways that obscure or make visible the work people do to make our material lives possible. The class will foreground issues of class and political economy in reading literature and culture from a working-class perspective.
Requirements: Admission to an English MA program or consent of instructor.

ENGL-480. Ethnic Literatures. 3 Hours.

A study of "ethnic," "minority," and U.S. Third World literatures, of the conditions of their emergence as literary formations in relation to cultural, social, and literary developments, and of their relationship to racial and ethnic studies.

ENGL-481. Latin American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course explores major works in Latin American literature across various genres (novel, drama, poetry). The rich pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods will be studied through works which represent the struggles of different people from different classes, with differing origins, and who hold disparate religious beliefs in this large and diverse region.

ENGL-482. Contemporary Poetic Forms. 3 Hours.

A study of the diverse poetic forms emerging in American poetry since the 1960's- free verse, new formalism, and many experimental forms- as well as the hands-on experience of writing in these forms.

ENGL-483. Postcolonial Literature. 3 Hours.

This course studies literary works produced by or about peoples who have been colonized by European imperial powers. It situates these literatures within the philosophical frameworks that informed European imperial hegemonies as well as the colonized people's responses to them. While we will draw theoretical examples from every part of the world, our literary readings in this class will concetrate mainly on the literatures of Africa and Asia and their diasporas, especially in the Caribbean.

ENGL-484. Contemporary U.S. Literature Since The Cold War. 3 Hours.

A study of the Cold War critical construction of "American" literature and important literary developments from the 1950s to the present, including the rise of postmodernism, the Beat Generation, and a variety of ethnic literary developments, as well as other important literary phenomena of the period.

ENGL-485. Contemporary European Literature. 3 Hours.

The aim of this course is to examine some important works of European literature from the 20th century till date. The course explores major isssues such as the place of ethics in literature, holocaust, the World War I II, European identity etc.

ENGL-487. Material Culture. 3 Hours.

In this seminar, students will concentrate on the material contexts (legal, economic, social, technological) that inform cultural production. While the cultural forms and historical periods focused upon may vary by instructor, in every case the course will introduce students to the history of critical work in this area and involve projects in which students trace the marks of material forces in cultural forms.
Requirement: two additional courses at the 400 level
Prerequisite: ENGL-410 minimum grade of C.

ENGL-488. Africana Literature: Slavery And The Literary Imagination. 3 Hours.

Through the lens of former slaves and contemporary novelists and scholars, this course explores the ways in which the slavery narrative and the neo-slave narrative attend to the larger existential question of what it means to be free. The corollary notions of race, gender, citizenship, and labor, among others, will also be considered. In addition, this class will investigate the ways in which the re-inscription of slavery, in contemporary literature, has impacted the development of the Africana literary tradition in terms of content, genre, and form.

ENGL-491. Sonnet: Not Just A Love Song. 3 Hours.

This class will explore the sonnet's many voices and subjects-from plaintive to menacing, from romance to racial injustice. We will read across the centuries, from Shakespeare to Keats to Edna St. Vincent Millay. We will read sonnet-variations, and sonnet-spoofs by contemporary American poets and we will experiment with sonnets of our own. Our time will be spent on close readings, discussions, writing, and informal presentations.

ENGL-495. Re-Thinking Race & Gender. 3 Hours.

This is an intensive summer course that runs for ten days over three weeks. It takes up history critically to engage in a concentrated re-thinking of how we learn to see, identify, and inhabit issues of race and gender. Workshops, lectures, and sessions with invited guests will unpack structures and relations of race and gender and the ways they get naturalized. The course is designed for graduates, undergraduates, and teachers, and is cross-listed in the Graduate College and the College of Arts Sciences.
Requirements: Graduate status or junior-senior status in English, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, WGS, AFAM or LGBTQ.

ENGL-5901. Thesis Hours. 1 Hour.

Graduate students complete an extensive, lengthy research or creative project under the guidance of a supervising committee. The thesis is optional for English graduate students and accounts for 6 of the 33 credit hours required for the M.A.

ENGL-5902. Thesis Hours. 2 Hours.

See course description for ENGL-5901.

ENGL-5903. Thesis Hours. 3 Hours.

See course description for ENGL-5901.